10 free Photoshop brushes for painting nature

This workshop originally appeared in ImagineFX. Download all 10 brushes here. It usually requires some editing and rotating, but generally greatly speeds up the painting process. When shading with these brushes, try to gradually move on from darkest to lightest shades. Once done, paint some individual leaves   with an airbrush on top of the area. It’s definitely most effective when you blur the outcome and regularly change the hues and brightness. Marble
This is a wonderful brush extracted from a marble photo, which I use excessively for a multitude of things. The brushes shown here were created from photos I found on the internet. Rocks
Painting rocks is extremely hard and time consuming. Photoshop:
Opacity: 5-50%
Flow: 100%
Spacing: 25%
Other dynamics: Opacity and flow Jitter: 0%
Painter:
Unavailable
03. Just run over the night sky with this brush, first with a larger size and higher transparency (for distant stars) gradually blurring and changing to smaller and more opaque. Using it requires a bit of patience as the stamp has to be rotated continuously, but it enables you to create truly realistic effects after getting used to it. It is very easy to use and very efficient for realistic renders, so long as you remember to switch the opacity and colours constantly throughout the painting process. However, where possible, I am also going to write down the settings for standard Corel Painter brushes. The majority of brushes described here are photograph based for the sake of realism and have been created in Photoshop. Photoshop:
Opacity: 5-50%
Flow: 100%
Painter:
Unavailable
07. Once the texture is done, duplicate the layer with it, flipping it horizontally and setting its layer mode to Soft Light. Its edges are sharp, due to the photo extraction, so be sure to blur the painted leaf blobs from time to time to avoid artificial looking results. Once you have the basis done, pick an airbrush or hard round of a lighter colour and add some additional blades. Photoshop:
Opacity: 30-70%
Flow: 100%
Painter:
Unavailable
06. Clouds
This brush is quite a simple shape and consists of a few merged airbrush tips. Now, we have come to the third and final part, which will be devoted to enhancing landscapes and everything that you might find useful for painting nature. Tree bark
This is another brush that I extracted from an old photo I took a while back. Blades of grass
This brush is great for basic texturing of a grassy field. After you place it over an area, enhance the effect by underlining the cracked edges with a lighter stroke. Aside from its main use, it can also be handy for painting lightning. They’re extremely handy if you need to add detail to your painting but are feeling a bit lazy – I always use them when painting glades, forests and such. In this three-part workshop, I’ve tried to lay out the general rules and custom brush settings to as well as show some tips and tricks on unconventional ways to use them. It can be employed for general painting and texturing, texturing of flat stone surfaces and even skin deformities. Stars
Now that is a fast way to paint a sky! Use it as a stamp, preferably on a multiply layer mode. Photoshop:
Opacity: 50-100%
Flow: 100%
Painter:
Unavailable
08. Leaves
This photo brush is extremely useful for painting leaves in distant backgrounds. The first part was devoted to painting characters, the second part described painting textiles. Use it as a stamp, from time to time rotating the blobs. For extra realism you can also add some loose leaves, sticks and so on. Use this brush as a typical hard round, constantly playing with the opacity and colour. This brush has a lot of functions and, aside from texturing bark, can be used for painting cracks, facial marks and scars. General texturing
I use this brush for speed painting landscapes, when I rarely switch between the brush types.

Updated: 30.11.2014 — 05:12