Inverse Configurations

IJP Yeosu 2012 Thematic Pavilion, Yeosu, South Korea, 2009
Model seen from the northwest. The pavilion sits near the geographic centre of the area defined by the six public access points of the fair. The large circular oculus pours ambient daylight levels throughout the building (perceived at the end of the public exhibition route, this gigantic opening looms over the visitor like a rising orb). As the point of convergence of the Yeosu 2012 World Expo, the form of IJP’s Thematic Pavilion is simple, yet memorable, involving a simple spherical form
Figure 8. On the ocean side, the Floating Island extends the pavilion to create an artificial shoreline, further extended underwater by a man-made Marine Life reef. IJP, Yeosu 2012 Thematic Pavilion, Yeosu, South Korea, 2009
Masterplan. The programme is housed on circular floor plates distributed around a large atrium, and the interiors are naturally lit through windows and internal openings. IJP’s Thematic Pavilion features an elementary spherical form sitting on the edge of the sea, and topped with a large circular opening. It is located on the geographic centre of the boundary defined by the six public access points of the Yeosu 2012 World Fair

Figure 9. Figure 10. IJP, Yeosu 2012 Thematic Pavilion, Yeosu, South Korea, 2009
Ground-floor plan of the pavilion showing the entrance lobby, the Floating Island and the Marine Life reef that surrounds it. The fanning outline of the Marine Reef illustrates how a closed primitive positioned next to the centre of the transformation will invert into an open superficial expanse for the same geometric reason that a circle passing though the centre of inversion will map onto an (infinite) straight line. The two figures are derived by inverting two primitives relative to the same centre, but with a different coefficient.

Updated: 29.10.2014 — 01:20